Library Administration

Librarians and IT: Mixing Oil and Water?

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Truman A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

The most common higher education departmental merger is that of the library and the information technology department (Hardesty, 1998). Unfortunately, the merger of these two departments has been cited as a source of conflict within the organization (Renaud, 2001; Wagner, 2000). No quantitative evidence existed regarding the actual levels of perceived conflict between these two groups or the degree to which levels of conflict differ between the two groups.

Call me, maybe

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
3:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Kat Barden

LLAMA has a mentoring program that pairs new and new-ish library administrators with a seasoned veteran to advise and think with them about the transition between library school student and "real life." Through emails, face to face, and phone/video conferencing the mentor and mentee share goals, employment strategies, and work through transition dilemmas. It is sometimes helpful to have an "outsider's" view and input. Come learn about the application process, the program benefits and hear from a participant.
http://prezi.com/akbqnqaceyeo/call-me-maybellama-mentoring/#

Let's move the cheese

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
2:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Kat Barden

Sometimes the mice move, I mean students' habits change, so you have to move the cheese! Are you caught in a maze of lending, marketing, and organization that result in ever shrinking circulation numbers? There is a way to turn that statistical frown upside down. Using integrated marketing techniques that are not new, but just might be new to libraries, you can brand and broaden your "collection" to include services and outside resources using your outreach efforts as your marketing tool. With integrative marketing/programming strategies ...

Meeting Some Library Facility Challenges

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson A
Computer: 
I will use my Windows laptop

This session considers a range of factors relevant not only to library facilities planning for construction or renovation, but also to any contemplation of different furnishings or other changes that are supposed to improve library facilities for the various people that use them. An architect may focus more on a dramatic element such as a soaring skylight than on custodians' daily routines. An interior designer may be more attuned to uniform lines and certain colors than to patrons’ and particularly students’ diverse preferences.

An Archway Affair to Remember - events, promotions and displays

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
3:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Theresa Flett, Reference Librarian, St. Charles Community College
Lisa Pritchard, Public Services Librarian , Jefferson College
Susan Fuchs, Technical Services and InterLibrary Loan Administrator, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

This panel presentation will discuss various college library events, promotions, or displays from the past couple years at Archway cluster libraries. This session is also an idea exchange for the last 5-10 minutes of things you’ve done at your institution. Come gather some new ideas to implement at your library at various levels of cost – (many FREE!) Handouts provided.

A bit more indepth and interactive than Share Fair.

Assessing Information Literacy at the Community College

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
10:15am
Room: 
Jefferson B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

St. Louis Community College (STLCC) librarians have had a difficult time assessing the information literacy of their students due to a variety of reasons, including the fact that many students are not in any formal curricular program and that no formal curricular program currently includes any formal information literacy requirement. Reference Librarian Katy Smith spent a semester surveying and interviewing freshman orientation and capstone students in an attempt to assess student information literacy levels at both the beginning and the end of an STLCC education.

Home Grown: What is the Future of Locally Developed Library Systems, Software, and Hardware?

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Truman C
Computer: 
I will use my Windows laptop

Over the decades, librarians have ridden a love-hate roller coaster regarding locally designed, built, and maintained information systems, software, and hardware. (In a parallel universe, we have ridden an inversely similar love-hate roller coaster regarding vendor-designed, built, and maintained systems, software, and hardware.) This session will explore -- at a fairly high level, but with specific examples -- the recent past and foreseeable future of locally created stuffed used by libraries and library users.

High Impact Assessment: Using Focus Groups to Support Change in Your Library

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Jefferson B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Lynn S. Cline, Head, Collection Development & Acquisitions, Missouri State University Libraries
Sherry Mahnken, Reference/Outreach Librarian, Missouri S&T

Focus groups—a technique often used in the for-profit world to test ideas and gather feedback from customers--have been adapted and applied at many libraries. Library customers (or users or patrons) have a lot to tell us about what we can improve to make their experience better with the library. This panel discussion features three academic libraries that held focus groups in the last year.

Proving Your Library's Value: Communicating Return-On-Investment

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Jefferson C
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

The Missouri Dept. of Transportation (MoDOT) Library partners with researchers in addition to being a MOBIUS consortium member. Facing pressure to justify costs, MoDOT's peer group commissioned a library return-on-investment study. The resulting toolkit moves beyond a reliance on calculators and context-specific studies of public and academic libraries.

Books as social media: Using the library brand to make connections

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson C
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

Most people think of books when they think of libraries. Thus, books are a recognizable library brand. At Maryville University—Saint Louis, we are leveraging the library brand to promote the library and the university. The library is active in or has initiated the following programs relating to books, boosting library recognition: Hot Reads, the library book club, Maryville Reads, Maryville Talks Books, the St. Louis Speakers Series campus visits, and the all faculty book group.

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