Circulation

Any Excuse for a Pizza Party!: Using Sierra as the Vehicle for a Circulation Training Refresher

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
10:15am
Room: 
Truman B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

Whether it is during a reference interaction or a circulation transaction, the Rockhurst University Library is committed to high-quality customer service. The library employs various tools, such as online application forms, training, online support and on-the-job guidance in order to hold circulation assistants to certain professional standards. It can be difficult, however, to oversee all of the student assistants given erratic work times and minimal work hours. Like other MOBIUS libraries, the Rockhurst University Library transitioned from Millennium to Sierra in February.

Let's move the cheese

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
2:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Kat Barden

Sometimes the mice move, I mean students' habits change, so you have to move the cheese! Are you caught in a maze of lending, marketing, and organization that result in ever shrinking circulation numbers? There is a way to turn that statistical frown upside down. Using integrated marketing techniques that are not new, but just might be new to libraries, you can brand and broaden your "collection" to include services and outside resources using your outreach efforts as your marketing tool. With integrative marketing/programming strategies ...

Where's the book? How to use Access to track incoming and outgoing courier mail

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Jefferson A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Dan Henke, Circulation Supervisor, Missouri S&T

Missouri S&T instituted an Access database to track its incoming and outgoing courier mail over 3 years ago. This database has proved extremely useful in tracking an item's whereabouts, especially if a patron claims to have returned the item. We will demonstrate the basic parameters of how our database is constructed, how we use queries to find information about courier items, and how other libraries can create their own database, even if they aren't Access experts.

Books as social media: Using the library brand to make connections

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson C
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

Most people think of books when they think of libraries. Thus, books are a recognizable library brand. At Maryville University—Saint Louis, we are leveraging the library brand to promote the library and the university. The library is active in or has initiated the following programs relating to books, boosting library recognition: Hot Reads, the library book club, Maryville Reads, Maryville Talks Books, the St. Louis Speakers Series campus visits, and the all faculty book group.

Create Lists Lab

Day: 
Tuesday
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Jennifer Parsons, Systems Librarian, MOBIUS

MOBIUS staff are here to help you! Bring your Create List questions and problems and get the answers you need. Query building, nested searching, existing and saved searches, regular expressions. MOBIUS trainers, Christopher Gould and Jennifer Parsons, will help you find the answers.

Print Templates Lab

Day: 
Tuesday
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Jennifer Parsons, Systems Librarian, MOBIUS

MOBIUS staff are here to help you with your Print Templates questions and problems. Are you using print templates to customize spine labels, circulation notices, acquisitions or serials forms? Have you run into a snag? Have an unanswered question? Or do you just want to find out about some of the cool features you've heard about, such as adding a link to My Millennium in emailed courtesy notice? MOBIUS trainers, Christopher Gould and Jennifer Parsons, will answer your questions.

Stu-jitsu: The Gentle Art of Supervising Student Workers

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Truman B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

The hiring, training, supervising and retention of student workers are lynchpins in the successful delivery of services in an academic library regardless of the size of the library and its parent institution. Yet how often are these student worker processes given their due attention and time? How can you optimize your efforts to make your student workers are a value added work force and not just warm bodies that get tasks done in a just acceptable fashion? How can you train your students to learn multiple technologies even as they change such as the transition from Millennium to Sierra?

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