Presentation

Getting started with OMEKA.net

Day: 
Tuesday
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

Do you want to start an online digital archive but have limited funding and/or no access LINUX? OMEKA, the open source digitization software, has a sister site, OMEKA.net that we are using at Logan College of Chiropractic to create a searchable, standards-based website showcasing our archival collections. In this presentation, we’ll discuss the process Logan has gone through over the last year as we have digitized, created metadata, and uploaded to OMEKA.net. We’ll discuss the pros and cons and lessons learned and showcase what we’ve accomplished so far.

Where's the book? How to use Access to track incoming and outgoing courier mail

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Jefferson A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Dan Henke, Circulation Supervisor, Missouri S&T

Missouri S&T instituted an Access database to track its incoming and outgoing courier mail over 3 years ago. This database has proved extremely useful in tracking an item's whereabouts, especially if a patron claims to have returned the item. We will demonstrate the basic parameters of how our database is constructed, how we use queries to find information about courier items, and how other libraries can create their own database, even if they aren't Access experts.

Missouri State Library's Digital Collection of State Government Documents

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
10:15am
Room: 
Jefferson A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

The Reference Services Division of the Missouri State Library is continuing to build its digital collection of state government documents. Come see what it looks like, what is in it, tips on searching, and workarounds to problems with the repository software.

High Impact Assessment: Using Focus Groups to Support Change in Your Library

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Jefferson B
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Lynn S. Cline, Head, Collection Development & Acquisitions, Missouri State University Libraries
Sherry Mahnken, Reference/Outreach Librarian, Missouri S&T

Focus groups—a technique often used in the for-profit world to test ideas and gather feedback from customers--have been adapted and applied at many libraries. Library customers (or users or patrons) have a lot to tell us about what we can improve to make their experience better with the library. This panel discussion features three academic libraries that held focus groups in the last year.

Proving Your Library's Value: Communicating Return-On-Investment

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
11:15pm
Room: 
Jefferson C
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

The Missouri Dept. of Transportation (MoDOT) Library partners with researchers in addition to being a MOBIUS consortium member. Facing pressure to justify costs, MoDOT's peer group commissioned a library return-on-investment study. The resulting toolkit moves beyond a reliance on calculators and context-specific studies of public and academic libraries.

Making Numbers and Dates Add Up for Music Materials

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
2:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson C
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

This session aims to demystify the various sorts of numbers and dates associated with music materials (primarily printed music and sound recordings, but also "music-like" numbers in books). Types of numbers to be covered will include plate and publisher numbers for printed music; issue and matrix numbers for sound recordings; various sorts of standard numbers (the International Standard Music Number, the Uniform Price Code, the European Article Number); and numbers that don't matter in cataloging.

Books as social media: Using the library brand to make connections

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson C
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

Most people think of books when they think of libraries. Thus, books are a recognizable library brand. At Maryville University—Saint Louis, we are leveraging the library brand to promote the library and the university. The library is active in or has initiated the following programs relating to books, boosting library recognition: Hot Reads, the library book club, Maryville Reads, Maryville Talks Books, the St. Louis Speakers Series campus visits, and the all faculty book group.

The R-Squared Experience

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
2:30pm
Room: 
Jefferson A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Lorraine Sandstrom, The Library Center Branch Manager, Springfield-Greene County Library District
Gay Wilson, Planning & Development Librarian, Springfield-Greene County Library District

Libraries are always striving to maintain their relevance in their community. In 2012, the R-Squared: Risk and Reward Conference sought to expand libraries' use of risk taking, creativity, and development of innovative ideas in order to reap the rewards of an engaged and stronger community. Discover methods from the Customer Curiosity and Abundant Community Experiences that may inspire you to become a more creative, innovative risk taker and enhance your library's relevance and community impact.

Session Files: 

Till Death Do Us Part: Staging a Murder Mystery at Your Library!

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
10:15am
Room: 
Truman A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)
Co-presenter(s): 
Bethany Messersmith, Information Literacy Librarian, Southwest Baptist University

Over the past year, the marketing committee at Southwest Baptist University Libraries explored ways to enhance and promote the library not only as a positive learning environment, but a space that students can utilize for a host of different pursuits and activities. Last fall we began planning for a wedding-themed murder mystery at the Harriett K. Hutchens Library. Many other libraries have done this in the past, making information literacy or new student orientations the focus of the event. Our intent was strictly to facilitate an evening of entertainment for students.

Cutting Out the Middle Man: How a Small Library Saved Money and Expanded Periodicals by Bringing Serials In-House

Day: 
Tuesday
Time: 
1:30pm
Room: 
Truman A
Computer: 
I can use the Podium PC (with Windows)

Confronted by growing enrollment, additional programs, a diminishing budget and increasing serials costs, learn how a small college library achieved the seemingly impossible allowing it to maintain its current selection of periodical titles and add others without an infusion of additional funds. Moving from jobber-based serial procurement to in-house procurement opened up nearly 15 percent of its serials budget and supported investment in growing the collection in ways that were previously unthinkable.

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